Murder in the Name of Honour

I always admired Rana Husseini’s work but after I read her book “Murder in the Name of Honor” I now admire her even more for her courage, drive and continuous fight for the victims of the – so called – honour crimes. She challenges the status quo even if it threatens her life.

Where the media fails to talk about honour crimes around the world in detail Rana Husseini succeeds.

Rana starts us on her journey of becoming the first and only voice in Jordan, at the time, of the victims of the – so called – honour crimes. She read a short article in the newspaper about a woman killed in the name of honour and decided to go , all by herself, to the girls neighbourhood to learn from her family; Why was she murdered? Who killed her? What happened? I daresay a task most courageous men might be afraid to perform.

She details some of the cases, she talks about her supporters but most importantly does not shy from naming the people, mostly big figures in Jordan,  standing in the way of achieving justice for the victims.

What I found very interesting are her interviews with some of the men who have murdered their daughters, sisters or wives. I was interested in seeing the other side of the story, how did these men decide to commit the crime? How were they pushed to doing it and by whom? After committing the crime, how are these men handling it? How do they live with the fact that they killed a loved one?

Although most of these men were celebrated in their neighbourhoods after they committed the crime, they were mostly ruined men after. No one marries their girls to these men in fear that they will do the same to their wife or children. No one in the society that pushed them to perform this crime stood by them after the fact or cared what happened to them. They were simply shunned.

So called honour crimes do not just simply kill the victim but they also ruin families. The crime leaves the family completely ruined and in shambles.

I can’t do the book justice by this review, I urge you to read it. This book is a great resource and full of useful information about honour crimes in the region.

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10 Responses

  1. will get it it from Amazon.

    Watch Forbidden Lies, a docuemntary about that total biaaaatch Norma Khoury, Rana Husseini is interviewed in it, awesome docuemntary. It’s showing on Showtime now and was in our local theater in the summer

  2. I read this book over the summer and I thought it was great! It made me think about the tragedies from a different perspective….it’s like she made it personal!

    I’ve been trying to watch Forbidden Lies but I can’t find it….neither netflix nor blocbuster carry it. As hareega said, a blog commenter told me they play it on showtime so I need to look up the times and see if they still do.

    Here’s my blog post about it (actually it’s more about norma khouri):

    http://diarysequel.blogspot.com/2009/06/investigating-norma-khouri-in-forbidden.html

  3. I have a draft about the book in kinzi’s blog purgatory, as there were so many topics to cover!!

    We just watched Forbidden Lies before I was in the US, it was fascinating to watch how easily one manipulative and clever person can deceive BOTH those on both sides of the spectrum.

    I too was interested to hear the stories of the perps. Although for one who is not enmeshed in the culture that propelled them to do so, I didn’t have much sympathy due to the brutality with which most of the killings are executed. Culture didn’t make them do that.

    It was a good reminder that anger management would be a good thing to teach in elementary school.

  4. Hareega: I am dying to watch it, I have read the book back when it first came out and it made me furious to how this woman used the fight against honor killings to further her career and to make money. I went to the book store and returned my copy telling them, you put it in the auto biography section where it really belonged to fiction.

    I love Rana , I have seen a documentary on honor crimes on CBC (Canada broadcasting channel) she has reached out to the whole world and won many awards. Not sure what’s her status in Jordan but she should be celebrated there too!

    Asoom: IT somehow made you think more about hte subject. Consider different things and really think about what could you do or the government do to battle this problem.

    Kinzi: I read the book about a month ago and it sat in my drafts for so long, as you said so much to cove. But I thought put it out there and i have some thoughts to expand on that I want to do in future posts.

    Make no mistake, reading their part of the story did not make me have ANY sympathy towards the perps. It’s just that it amazed me how they are so shunned. Made me think that maybe one of them should speak out and tell other people not to do it because it destroyed their lives and their families lives. Maybe do it in elementary or high schools like they do for people who used to be drug addicts in North America and how they go to schools and say, my life was destroyed and so on.

    Just a thought.

  5. Social comments and analytics for this post…

    This post was mentioned on Twitter by NadineToukan: rt @7akifadi New post. Murder in the Name of Honour http://bit.ly/4R8xj – @NoHonorInCrime #jordan #jo #crime…

  6. Sounds like a challenging read. I like your point about how the men’s lives are also broken after the event.

    I must disagree with Kinzi however. To a great extent, culture does play a role in these things. In a strongly male-dominated environment, these things will happen. Men have to be taught from a young age that they are not responsible for the actions of the women in their family. In many families, if the men are silent, people goad them saying how are they allowing the woman to behave like this and so on…until they react violently.

    And sad to say, a lot of times, it can be other women who do the goading :(

  7. NIshita: “Men have to be taught from a young age that they are not responsible for the actions of the women in their family”

    I totally agree, childrens male role models have to speak up.

    And it’s not only about honor crime, this happens after all other things have been exhausted, most probably the girl gets taken out of school, taken out of work, beaten, verbally abused and after all that does not work she is killed. I do believe that violence against women is the battle to fight.

  8. [...] – Murder in the Name of Honour [...]

  9. […] Murder in the Name of HonourPosted on October 20, 2009 by 7aki FadiI always admired Rana Husseini’s work but after I read her book “Murder in the Name of Honor” I now admire her even more for her courage, drive and continuous fight for the victims of the – so called – honour crimes. She challenges the status quo even if it threatens her life.Where the media fails to talk about honour crimes around the world in detail Rana Husseini succeeds.Rana starts us on her journey of becoming the first and only voice in Jordan, at the time, of the victims of the – so called – honour crimes. She read a short article in the newspaper about a woman killed in the name of honour and decided to go , all by herself, to the girls neighbourhood to learn from her family; Why was she murdered? Who killed her? What happened? I daresay a task most courageous men might be afraid to perform.She details some of the cases, she talks about her supporters but most importantly does not shy from naming the people, mostly big figures in Jordan, standing in the way of achieving justice for the victims.What I found very interesting are her interviews with some of the men who have murdered their daughters, sisters or wives. I was interested in seeing the other side of the story, how did these men decide to commit the crime? How were they pushed to doing it and by whom? After committing the crime, how are these men handling it? How do they live with the fact that they killed a loved one?Although most of these men were celebrated in their neighbourhoods after they committed the crime, they were mostly ruined men after. No one marries their girls to these men in fear that they will do the same to their wife or children. No one in the society that pushed them to perform this crime stood by them after the fact or cared what happened to them. They were simply shunned.So called honour crimes do not just simply kill the victim but they also ruin families. The crime leaves the family completely ruined and in shambles.I can’t do the book justice by this review, I urge you to read it. This book is a great resource and full of useful information about honour crimes in the region.http://7akifadi.com/2009/10/20/murder-in-the-name-of-honour/ […]

  10. […] Murder in the Name of HonourPosted on October 20, 2009 by 7aki FadiI always admired Rana Husseini’s work but after I read her book “Murder in the Name of Honor” I now admire her even more for her courage, drive and continuous fight for the victims of the – so called – honour crimes. She challenges the status quo even if it threatens her life.Where the media fails to talk about honour crimes around the world in detail Rana Husseini succeeds.Rana starts us on her journey of becoming the first and only voice in Jordan, at the time, of the victims of the – so called – honour crimes. She read a short article in the newspaper about a woman killed in the name of honour and decided to go , all by herself, to the girls neighbourhood to learn from her family; Why was she murdered? Who killed her? What happened? I daresay a task most courageous men might be afraid to perform.She details some of the cases, she talks about her supporters but most importantly does not shy from naming the people, mostly big figures in Jordan, standing in the way of achieving justice for the victims.What I found very interesting are her interviews with some of the men who have murdered their daughters, sisters or wives. I was interested in seeing the other side of the story, how did these men decide to commit the crime? How were they pushed to doing it and by whom? After committing the crime, how are these men handling it? How do they live with the fact that they killed a loved one?Although most of these men were celebrated in their neighbourhoods after they committed the crime, they were mostly ruined men after. No one marries their girls to these men in fear that they will do the same to their wife or children. No one in the society that pushed them to perform this crime stood by them after the fact or cared what happened to them. They were simply shunned.So called honour crimes do not just simply kill the victim but they also ruin families. The crime leaves the family completely ruined and in shambles.I can’t do the book justice by this review, I urge you to read it. This book is a great resource and full of useful information about honour crimes in the region.http://7akifadi.com/2009/10/20/murder-in-the-name-of-honour/ […]

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